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  1. Everything you need to know about staying sun safe

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    Make sure you stay sun safe this summer

    With summer in full swing, no doubt you have lots of fun, adventurous plans in the pipeline.

    Whether it’s hiking, camping, cycling, hitting the beach or planning a picnic in the park, there’s no better time to be outside, filling your lungs with fresh air and getting some much-needed vitamin D!

    And while it’s great to enjoy the warmer weather, it’s also important that you’re up to scratch on staying sun safe.

    No one wants to spend their leisure time burned or with sunstroke, or worse. So, to ensure that you and your family can have fun in the sun without worry, we’ve put together a handy guide for everything you need to know about sun safety.

    Cream Up

    Sun exposure can happen even on a cloudy British day, so if you’re out and about this summer, the number one rule is to slap on the sun cream regularly!

    Harmful UV rays are responsible for a number of ailments, from sunburn and premature ageing to more serious conditions such as skin cancer. That’s not to say you can’t safely enjoy the sun. Opting for a sun lotion of at least SPF30 and applying it every two to three hours if you’re outside for long periods of time can help protect you from sun damage.

    When buying sun cream, you should look for one that has at least a four-star UVA protection to ensure that it meets EU standards. You should also make sure it hasn’t past its expiry date. Most have a shelflife of two to three years.

    Sun protection factor (SPF) is a measure of the amount of ultraviolet B radiation (UBV) protection in the cream. This is rated on a scale of 2-50+, with 50+ offering the strongest protection and 2 offering the least. Sun creams that offer both UVA and UVB protection, sometimes referred to as ‘Broad Spectrum’, are the ones you should ideally opt for as they give you the best protection.

    So, how much sun cream should you apply for the best coverage, to stay sun safe?

    If you’re an adult, the equivalent of two tablespoons should do it. Although a good rule of thumb is the more the merrier, so don’t be afraid to apply it in excess!

    Applying plenty is particularly important for children and babies, whose skin is much more sensitive and vulnerable to sun damage. Babies under six months old should always be kept out of direct sunlight, and all children should be covered up with protective clothing, as well as being coated in a strong lotion with a high SPF.

    Whatever age you are, don’t forget to reapply lotion once you’ve been in water, even if your cream claims to be ‘water resistant’. The fact is, water washes it off, and when you’re in the ocean or a cool pool, you might not feel yourself getting burnt. Topping up your cream as soon as you’re out of water can reduce your chance of sun damage and keep the burn at bay.

    Seek the shade

    If you’re planning on spending the whole day outdoors, so to stay sun safe, make sure to hit the shade between 11am and 3pm, as this is when the sun is at its strongest. Even if you can’t avoid it completely, finding shady spots or shelters where you can eat lunch or take a break can help you escape the effects of sunstroke and keep you feeling cool and refreshed.

    Protect your eyes

    It’s super important to keep your eyes covered when you’re out in the sun. Being at the beach or anywhere that you’re exposed to bright sunshine can cause temporary burn to the eye’s surface, resulting in a painful sensation similar to sunburn of the skin.

    Reflected light from water, sand or concrete is also tough on the eyes, so it helps to have a good pair of sunglasses on hand to keep your peepers protected. Opt for styles with UVA/UVB protection and make sure they cover the whole of your eyes, so there’s no room for sunlight to creep in behind them.

    Know your limits

    While no one is exempt from the dangers of the sun, there are some people who are more at risk than others and they may need to take more precautions to stay sun safe.

    If you have pale skin, freckles, or red or fair hair, you should always wear a high factor sun cream and cover your skin with protective clothing and a hat. This is because pale skin is more prone to burning than darker skin tones.

    That’s not to say that those with darker skin are out of the woods. If you have any moles, you should regularly keep a close eye on them, and always cover them in the sun. If you notice any changes such as the appearance of a new mole, or a mole that has changed in size, shape or colour, it’s always best to check in with a doctor, just to be safe.

    Anyone with a family history of skin cancer should take extra care in the sun, as should anyone exposed to intense sun that their skin isn’t used to, such as when you’re on holiday.

    The better you know your skin and your limits regarding sun exposure, the easier it will be to protect yourself during summer expeditions.

    Stay hydrated

    Sun safety and keeping hydrated come hand in hand. Dehydration and heat exhaustion can lead to a multitude of issues, including dizziness, headaches and vomiting. The key is to stay hydrated, more so if you’re out in the sun for long periods of time.

    If you’re planning a hike or any similar outdoor activities, make sure to take along a reliable water bottle and keep it topped up regularly. Just make sure to steer clear of sugary drinks, caffeine or alcohol as these can lead to dehydration, as opposed to keeping it at bay.

    Sunburn SOS

    If you do happen to get burnt after a day in the sun, the first thing you should do is sponge the sore skin with cool water, before applying a soothing after-sun lotion, Aloe Vera cream or calamine lotion.

    If you’re suffering from a bad dose of sunstroke to go alongside your sunburn, make sure to drink plenty of water, and take painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen to help reduce the inflammation and ease the pain.

    If at any point your skin starts to blister or swell, or you feel unwell with chills, high temperature, headaches, sickness or dizziness, go visit your doctor.

    No matter what summer adventures you’re planning, staying sun safe is essential. If you want to know more about how we can help keep your whole family healthy and happy in the sun, get in touch with our team or check out what’s on offer in our sunshine-friendly range.

  2. The difference between walking boots and trekking shoes

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    It’s incredibly important to have a pair of comfortable footwear when you are walking or trekking.

    With footwear, you need to pick the right choice for your feet, activity and terrain. Without them, it can lead to bruised, sore feet that could end your walk or trek earlier than expected.

    As similar activities, it can be confusing to understand the difference between walking and trekking, and why they may use different footwear.

    That’s why we’ve put together this guide so you can tell the difference between the two and pick your perfect footwear.

    Walking boots

    Walking, or hiking, is a leisurely activity of walking long routes or nature trails. Walking is generally completed in a day, but can involve overnight stays in camping sites, hostels or huts along the way.

    Walking boots are sturdy, thick boots that provide protection for your feet. With a tough sole and high ankles, walking boots help provide support for your foot and prevent you from spraining or rolling your ankles.

    The thick protective material will also limit your range of movement, which can feel too restrictive for some walkers. The material will also need breaking in before big walks, otherwise, the shoes can be uncomfortable and cause rubbing or blisters.

    Walking boots are also made with waterproof materials to keep your feet dry in wet conditions.

    However, the waterproofing and thick material mean that water vapour can’t escape easily.

    So, if you need to cross rivers or your feet are fully submerged in water, your shoes will take a long time to dry out. If you wear them in the summer months, your feet will sweat more easily and can cause blisters.

    Overall, walking boots are strong, sturdy waterproof boots perfect for the colder months. They are also durable and can last you up to 1,000 miles when looked after.

    Trekking shoes

    Trekking is a multi-day long distance walk, where you will carry all your luggage and essential items with you. In general, trekking is a more challenging activity than walking and takes places in areas where other means of transport can’t access.

    Trekking shoes, such as trail runners, are made from lightweight and more flexible materials than walking boots. The lightweight material offers more flexibility, giving you a better range of movement in your feet.

    Trekking shoes are perfect for those who prefer lightweight footwear and are the ideal choice to get an overall lightweight kit. The shoes also need no breaking in and are ready for action right away.

    Designed with a low-cut ankle and multiple mesh patches, trekking shoes give you maximum breathability. As they are fast-drying, they are great for crossing rivers or through the summer months.

    However, trekking shoes aren’t as waterproof as walking boots and can’t offer the same amount of warmth through the winter.

    The lightweight material also doesn’t offer the same amount of protection as walking boots. With narrow soles, you can feel bumps and rocks under your feet which can be uncomfortable on the long days.

    Overall, trekking shoes are a lightweight, breathable and fast-drying shoe. However, they don’t offer the same protection, warmth or durability as walking boots.

    On average, trekking shoes should be replaced every 500 miles to prevent potential damage to your feet.

    Conclusion

    Overall, walking boots are tough, durable and waterproof boots that protect your feet. Trekking shoes don’t offer the same protection or durability but are more lightweight, breathable and flexible.

    When choosing between walking boots and trekking shoes, it’s important to bear in mind the weather and type of terrain you are going to face.

    During the summer months, or places where you are likely to cross a river you may prefer the fast-drying trekking booths. However, in wet, and colder months the waterproof walking boots may be the better fit.

  3. What are gaiters and when should you wear them?

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    Many backpackers and hikers swear by gaiters and use them year-round.

    Despite offering essential protection, gaiters are often overlooked and get confused in a long list of outdoor equipment.

    That’s why we’ve put together this guide so you know what exactly gaiters are and when you should be wearing them.

    What are Gaiters?

    Gaiters are lightweight, breathable and waterproof pieces of fabric that cover the upper boot and lower part of your legs.

    Working with your boots, gaiters protect all the tiny nooks and crannies that are vulnerable in certain weather or environment conditions, such as the top of the boot.

    In wet, muddy or snowy conditions, gaiters are essential for keeping your feet dry and can also provide an extra layer of insulation.

    In drier weather, gaiters will also protect you from debris such as rocks and sand that can uncomfortably lodge themselves inside your footwear.

    Gaiters provide great protection across a diverse range of conditions. Whether you are facing thorny bushes, marsh land or even snake bites, the gaiters will provide you an extra layer of defence to stop anything from getting into your boots or trouser legs.

    Made from mostly synthetic materials, gaiters are breathable, lightweight and quick drying. Gaiters are designed to be comfortable for walking and hiking long distances in a variety of conditions, making them an essential item for your pack.

    From puddles to thunderstorms, gaiters will keep you waterproof, insulated and protected.

    Generally, gaiters come in one of two heights: ankle-height and full-length.

    Full-length gaiters

    Full-length gaiters are a perfect fit for extreme weather conditions such as deep snow or heavy rain.

    Covering the tops of your boots and most of your lower leg, full-length gaiters offer the most protection.

    If you’re in terrains covered in snow, long wet grass, thick bush or you need to cross streams, full-length gaiters are essential for you.

    Ankle-height gaiters

    Ankle-height gaiters are made to simply cover the top of your footwear and bottom of your trousers.

    They don’t have the same level of protection as the full-length ones, and are best used for less extreme conditions.

    This type of gaiter is ideal for outdoor wear, with a good chance of rain and mud. It’s also perfect for offering protection from bits of debris such as stones, sand or bits of twig entering your footwear.

    This type of gaiter can also be a great fit for off-road and fell runners to provide protection from debris.

    For runners that want a more lightweight and fuller protection, our padded running gaiters may be the perfect fit for you.

    Conclusion

    Snow, water and debris can find a way into the most waterproof of boots and trousers. Gaiters are lightweight, waterproof and breathable, covering the ends of your boots and trousers, providing you with extra protection from the elements.

    Gaiters protect you from a range of outdoor conditions, including muddy puddles, debris, deep snow, streams and thick bush. Small and lightweight enough to stash in your pack, gaiters can be used year-round for almost every condition.

    Ready to unlock the benefits of gaiters? Browse our range today.

  4. Top 10 Christmas Gift Ideas For A Walker

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    Walkers Top 10 Kit

    If you are struggling to come up with ideas for the walker in your family then we have picked our top ten products that will keep them happy when outside in all weathers.

    1.Base Layers
    Sub Zero Base Layer Thermal Underwear Range For Walkers

    A cold walker is a miserable walker. Treat them to some  good quality base layers this Christmas and watch them transform from a prickly plodder to a happy hiker.

     

     

     

     

    2. Bottle Flask

    Klean Kanteen Stainless Steel Insulated Bottle Flask For Walkers

     

     

    If you are rather partial to a brew when walking and do not want to carry a stove, then taking an insulated vacuum flask with the tea or coffee already made is a great way of grabbing a quick cuppa when outdoors. Thermos flasks come in all shape and sizes these days, from wide mouth lunch jugs to robust stainless steel bottle flasks.

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Waterpoof Hat

    Waterproof Hats For Walkers

     

    Keeping your head dry in wet weather can be achieved either by pulling up your waterproof jacket hood or by wearing a waterproof hat. The advantages of using a waterproof hat rather than a hood is that they are more insulating, give you a better field of vision, and can be stored easily in a pocket or backpack.

     

     

     

     

    4. First Aid Kit

    First Aid Kits For Walkers

     

    Everybody has an accident at some point when walking, whether that be from stumbling on uneven ground, cutting a  finger on map edges, or  wearing poorly fitted walking boots that lead to blisters. If left untreated for any length of time, these wounds may hinder your progress or become infected. The solution is to carry a first aid kit in your backpack or pocket, allowing you to treat any minor injuries sustained by yourself or your walking group.

     

     

     

    5. Survival Bag

    Survival Bags And Blankets For Walkers

     

     

    Like all good boy scouts you should be prepared when stepping out in to the great outdoors. Lightweight and compact, these survival bags and blankets are manufactured form space age materials to keep you warm and dry until help arrives. They can also double up as a large visual aid should you get lost when walking.

     

     

     

     

     

    6. Insulated Down Jacket

    Insulated Down Jackets For Walkers

     

     

    The ultimate in walking comfort, insulated down jackets are like wearing a duvet on the hills. Being lightweight and compact, they can easily fit in to odd spaces in a backpack, and just need a good shake before being worn to activate the down insulation.

     

     

     

     

    7. Outdoor Compasses

    Brunton Outdoor Compasses For Walkers

     

     

    If the walker in your family is always getting lost then invest in a field compass to keep them on the straight and narrow. These compact lightweight navigational devices easily fit in to your jacket or trouser pocket, and come in a variety of styles with different features.

     

     

     

     

    8. Solid Fuel Camping Stoves

    Ghillie Kettle Solid Fuel Camping Stoves For Walkers

     

     

     

    Not the smallest of stoves we must confess but they eliminate the need for fuel to be carried. When you want a brew, just forage around for twigs, fir cones and leaves, and these Ghille Kettles will light with ease and boil water in a matter of minutes. Pan sets can be suspended above the top exhaust, allowing for a meal to be cooked at the same time. Manufactured in the UK from lightweight anodised aluminium, these solid fuel camping stoves are a very useful gadget for the survival enthusiast and minimalist walker.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    9. Walking Socks

    Technical socks for walkers

     

    Blisters and sores on walkers feet usually occur due to poor quality socks and bad fitting boots. Wearing a constructed walking socks will help to manage moisture, cushion your heel and sole, and help to prevent internal slipping and rubbing.

     

     

     

     

     

    10. Waterproof Gloves
    Waterproof Gloves For Walkers

     

    Wet hands quickly start to feel cold in the cooler months. Being able to keep them dry and also functional means that good fitting waterproof gloves are required.

     

     

     

     

  5. Best lightweight thermal underwear for Autumn weather

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    What is the best lightweight thermal underwear for changeable Autumn weather?

    Autumn can be an unpredictable month as one day it can be scorching hot whilst the next day you can get out of your tent and find ground frost. This swing in the weather cycle is not ideal if you are out on the hills for a  prolonged period of time as you have to pack for all eventualities. But how do you fine the best lightweight thermal underwear for the job? Researching the following four  properties when buying thermal underwear should help you get the best from your purchase.

    Insulation

    Best lightweight thermal underwear Sub Zero Factor 1 plusTo lighten your load it is a good idea to wear thermal underwear that will adapt to both hot and cold conditions. This is not  an endorsement for  thermal brands that claim they will keep you cool in summer and hot in winter. Anyone with a simple grasp of physics or textiles knows this is an impossibility. The best you can hope to achieve is a lightweight thermal  base layer that will insulate you in the cooler weather, but not be so insulating that you start to cook when the sun comes out.

    But how do you know how insulating/warm a thermal underwear brand is going to be? A simple but underused test is the TOG, which measures the thermal resistance of a fabric.  You have probably seen it used on duvets, mattresses and pillows, and the lower the figure, the less insulating it is. In the Autumn you need a lightweight thermal underwear brand that has a TOG rating of between 0.35-0.50. Anything higher and you are going to be too warm, anything lower and you will chill.

    Wicking Rates

    What this means is basically how quick perspiration is moved from the skins surface to the outside surface of the fabric, so it can evaporate or be moved on to the next clothing layer. The best lightweight thermal underwear garments will have a hydrophilic treatment applied to them. These chemicals actively aid the movement of moisture – hydrophilic means water loving – so vastly improve the fabrics own moisture transportation system. In the cooler Autumnal weather this process keeps a dry layer of air next to the skin (air being the insulator) helping you to keep warm. In warmer weather you will probably wear the lightweight thermal underwear on its own. A quick wicking rate will pump moisture out to the surface of the thermal and allow evaporation. This will help to cool you as water has a high heat capacity and needs a lot of energy to phase change i.e. transform from a  liquid to a gas.  In layman’s term, your excess body heat is absorbed by the water on the fabrics surface to change to a gas,  or evaporate as us mere mortals know the process.

    Construction and Fit

    Best lightweight thermal underwear needs good construction and fitThirdly, the lightweight thermal underwear must be snug fitting. By snug I do not mean restricting blood to an appendage so it goes purple with loss of circulation.  The base layer must be close fitting so no air can be wafted when you move. For someone who has not got the body of David Beckham this is not going to be a pretty sight as a good fitting thermal will contour to all your lumps and bumps. However, this close fit ensures that air is trapped next to the skin, insulating the wearer. It also aids hydrophilic treatments as they only work efficiently when there is a heat gradient. The best way to achieve this is by having the fabric in close contact to the skin.

    The best lightweight thermal underwear garments will also be constructed sympathetically to your activity. Look for thermal underwear that has a long body length so when you bend over to pick something up or tie your shoe laces your lower back does not become exposed. The sleeves should also be of a significant length that when you lift your arms they do not ride up and expose much your skin.

    Colour

    Finally, your choice in colour will also play an important part in how cool and hot you feel. Black is a good absorber of light wavelengths and will attract more energy from the sun than a lighter colour. However, black is also a good radiator of heat so in overcast weather it will loose heat quicker than a lighter colour. White is obviously the best colour for reflecting heat as it absorbs very little light. If you need thermal underwear in the autumn and are not sure on what weather conditions you are going to be subjected to then choose a colour between the extremes of white and black.

  6. The British Mountaineering Council (BMC) Courses And Data Sheets

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    The BMC organises a range of good practice courses, lectures and seminars, including:

     

    With partners, the BMC produces a range of safety and skills information, including:

     

    The BMC website also contains safety & skills advice, including:

     

  7. Ironbridge Gorge Walking Festival – Free Guided Walks

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    Ironbridge Gorge Walking Festival (Saturday 3rd – Sunday 11th May) is offering a choice of over 50 free, varied walks in and around the stunning Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site, where the Industrial Revolution began over 300 years ago.

    From challenging all-day hikes for the more experienced walker to family friendly trails and short informative walks, this year’s Festival has something to whet the appetite of all ages and abilities. With the newly acquired Walkers are Welcome, status a warm welcome is guaranteed in the town.

    As well as nearly 20 new walks, the 2014 Festival will be introducing the first 100 Mile Ironbridge Challenge. Those taking part must finish seven specified walks on seven different days with the combined mileage topping over 100 miles. Walkers completing the challenge will receive a certificate and woven badge for their rucksack.

    New walks include an early evening family outing on 7th May to explore the nature and wildlife in the enchanting woods at Loamhole Dingle, Coalbrookdale with a surprise for all and an opportunity to learn about the variety of wild flowers in Lodge Field under the guidance of an expert from Shropshire Wildlife Trust. There will also be additional nature walks with information to help identify trees and birds and an early evening ‘quiz walk’ around Coalbrookdale finishing at a local inn.

    Popular tried and tested walks being repeated explore historic trails and the part played by The Gorge in the Industrial Revolution. There’s also a gentle two-hour family treasure hunt suitable for pushchair and wheelchair users, alternatively experienced walkers can join a strenuous 15 mile circular hike over the Wrekin, ideal for walkers happy with steep climbs and rough terrain.

    For those wanting to discover more about the heritage of the area there is a walk that take in the history of the river bridges and a 15 mile circular walk skirting the edge of the World Heritage Site. Three walks explore the many churches and other places of worship in and around The Gorge on 6th and 9th May.

    All walks are free however pre-booking is essential; well-behaved dogs on a lead are welcome on most walks but check before booking. To reserve a place or request a copy of the programme contact the Ironbridge Visitor Information Centre by email at tic@ironbridge.org.uk; details at www.visitironbridge.co.uk/walkingfestival.

  8. Charity Walks Top Tips

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    Charity Walks may not be overly challenging, but you still need to prepare sensibly before setting off, especially if longer walks are not part of your normal routine.

    Regular walks of a few miles two or three times a week will head off problems if you’re new to walking longer distances for fun and fitness. Do take a few minutes before setting out to stretch muscles and get warmed off. Plus, build up your pace steadily rather than setting off like a rocket – remember the hare and the tortoise!

    Dress sensibly in layers to allow you to regulate how warm you feel as you step out. A key element is a good wicking baselayer to stop sweat evaporating on clammy skin and causing a chilly feeling. An easily adjustable mid layerfor warmth and a wind/waterproof outer layer should ensure you’ll stay comfortable. Don’t forget a hat as sunshine and rain can be expected in the same day in our climate!

    Stay hydrated by drinking water regularly – there are several options for carrying water from bottles to hydration packs.

    Walking briskly in warm weather and being well-hydrated means you should be sweating to help release core body heat. That’s good but can feel uncomfortable. A thin handkerchief soon becomes sopping wet but a small hand towel can be a welcome accessory.

    Suffolk Walking Festival 19th May – 10th June 2012

  9. Ten Reasons Why You’ll Enjoy Walking in Jersey

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    Walking in Jersey allows you to discover the islands heritage and natural beauty that otherwise would be missed when driving a car. In a series of free guided walks designed for you whatever your age and experience, the Walking Weeks offer almost 40 walks to choose from – over 1000 participants usually take part in both Walking Weeks.

    Put a spring in your step as Winter starts to draw to a close but don’t relax your guard on staying warm and dry. A snug baselayer combined with an insulating mid layer under an outer layer to protect you from wind and rain will ensure flexibility and comfort.

     

    Top 10 Reasons For Walking In Jersey

     

    1. Green Lanes

    Jersey’s famous ‘Green Lanes’, found in all but two of the Island’s twelve parishes, are identified by a special road sign. Walkers, cyclists and horse riders love these tranquil, highly scenic byways. And – for once – walkers have priority, not the car, since the maximum speed limit is just 15mph (24kph). In other words – this 50-mile network of narrow, tree-lined lanes are a walker’s paradise.

    2. Coastal Walking

    The Island is also renowned for its fifty miles of coastal walks with splendid views of Guernsey, Sark and Herm from the north coast, and of France from the east. On the north and south coasts you’ll spot big differences. The north is rocky and rugged, with a curtain of spectacular 400ft/120m cliffs that slope to a south coast fringed by vast expanses of sand.

    3. In the Country

    Jersey may be famous for its coastline, but the Island is also a rural paradise of green lanes and hidden valleys cloaked in wildlife-rich woodland. Jersey Tourism also has a selection of pub walks that combine great walking with good food, heritage trails and parish trails.

    4. Wildlife Watch

    Red squirrels still live and thrive in the woods and the Island is a stopping-off place for many migratory birds. Other residents include the green lizard and the rare agile frog (not found anywhere else in Britain). You may even meet the brown or olive toad that gives local residents their nickname, ‘Crapauds’ (a Jèrriais or Jersey-French word).

    5. Two Feet; Four Wheels

    At nine miles by five and with an excellent public transport network, the Island is easily accessible for walking with only a bus timetable as a guide. Linear and circular walking routes are easy to put together. The local Connex bus service operates all year, and in summer there are additional ‘Island Explorer’ buses bringing even greater frequency and coverage, enabling you to link up services with added convenience.

    6. Warm Walks

    The Island’s southerly location and its protected position in the Bay of St Malo result in an attractive, temperate climate that makes Jersey one of the warmest and sunniest places in the British Isles. In the warmer months, walkers tend to head for the coast, tackling the cliffs and beaches. In contrast, the colourful and sheltered valleys, woods and scenic reservoirs provide an entirely different atmosphere in autumn and winter.

    7. Walks for All

    Jersey suits all kinds of walking. If you’re ambitious try the ‘Around Island’ walk that can be completed with the aid of an OS -style map over three or four days or as part of a guided group during one of Jersey’s two Walking Week Festivals.

    8. Naturally Speaking

    In 1997, Jersey became the first Island to gain Green Globe status. There are many designated ‘Sites of Special Interest’ and four internationally-recognised wetlands known as Ramsar Sites, covering the south-east coast and three offshore reefs.

    9. En Route

    You’ll encounter Jersey’s rich and diverse history on paths and trails everywhere. Fort Leicester and L’Étacquerel Fort, both located at Bouley Bay, were built to keep out the French. Look out for the Island’s iconic Jersey Round Towers and ghostly remnants from World War Two.

    10. Get Yourself a Guide

    Jersey Tourism’s programme of escorted walking tours with experienced Blue Badge guides takes in the Island’s unique history, heritage, landscapes and seascapes – see the latest ‘What’s On’ guide for details. Best of all are the Island’s two annual walking festivals – the Spring and Autumn Walking Weeks, with a huge choice of guided walks for all abilities.

     

     

  10. Rock Pound the Bounds Registration Open

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    Registration for the popular Worcestershire walking/running event Rock Pound the Bounds is now open. Taking place on Sunday 4th May 2014, Rock Pound the Bounds offers walkers and runners of all ages and abilities a great opportunity to exercise amongst parts of Worcestershire’s beautiful countryside. The event also enables participants to raise much-needed funds for the Midlands Air Ambulance Charity. Starting from the village hall in Rock near Kidderminster, entrants can join the 25, 18, 12, nine or six mile walks; for youngsters who want to get involved, there’s a three mile treasure trail.

    Henk Buzink, one of the organisers of Rock Pound the Bounds, said, “This is the fourteenth year we’ve organised the event and the third time we’ve teamed up with Midlands Air Ambulance Charity to organise the Pound the Bounds. No matter if you’re an experienced rambler or are just looking to increase the amount of walking you do, our event is a great way to enjoy a walk and fundraise for charity.”

    Registration and sponsorship forms can be downloaded from the Pound the Bounds website. To find out more about the Midlands Air Ambulance Charity, visit www.midlandsairambulance.com

     

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