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  1. Can You Wear Two Base Layers?

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    Can you wear two base layers? - Sub Zero Factor 1 and All Active worn by a female hiker

    At first glance of the question, Can you wear two base layers? You immediately think yes you can but why would you want to? Most outdoors people are well versed in the principles of the layering system – base layer, insulating mid layer, protective outer layer – so why would you ignore this and just wear two base layers. The problem is that in certain situations this layering system can be impractical.

    BASE LAYERS FOR AEROBIC EXERCISE

    If you are going to take part in a high intensity aerobic exercise in winter such as rowing, it is unfeasible to wear lots of different clothing layers. For a start you are going to get warm very quickly as well as producing a lot of perspiration.  You are also going to need full range of movement which will be hampered with a traditional layering system. Plus there is also the problem of storing all these different clothes when removed.

    What a lot of professional rowing teams practice in winter is wearing two thermal base layers at the start of a days training programme. Without being restrictive, these thermal layers will keep you warm whilst also managing perspiration more efficiently. Once the warm up is complete, one of the base layers is removed and easily stored in the bottom of the boat. At the cool down, the discarded base layer can be worn again to reduce rapid cooling.

    Even in the coolness of early summer mornings a two layer base layer system is often used. Next to the skin will be worn a summer base layer to manage perspiration, with a thermal base layer as a second layer to provide extra warmth during the warm up.

    BASE LAYERS FOR SPRING AND AUTUMN WEATHER

    Out of the winter season, the need for a full thermal layering system is usually unnecessary. With the temperatures very rarely reaching freezing, you should be able to get away with just wearing your base layer. However, some early mornings and evenings may see temperatures drop low enough to require wearing extra layers for a boost in warmth. You could pack a thermal mid layer on the off chance, but it is a lot of unnecessary weight to carry.

    Instead, ensure you are carrying a second base layer – you should be carrying a spare set anyway if you are heading away from civilisation. They can easily be worn over your first base layer and are light enough to be stored in a small rucksack.

    BASE LAYERS FOR EXTREME COLD ENVIRONMENTS

    When it comes to very cold weather, such as found in the polar regions or the Himalayas, mountaineers and explorers will often wear more than one base layer as part of their layering system. The main reason for this is you can trap more air between thin layers than wearing bulky insulating layers. And trapping air is essential if you want to keep warm because air is the insulator, not the fabric.  It is not uncommon for mountaineers to wear two or even three base layers beneath their insulating mid layer.

    SO CAN YOU WEAR TWO BASE LAYERS?

    Instead of being a bit of a wacky question there are certain situations where wearing two base layers can actually be desirable. It is a lightweight alternative to heavier insulating mid layers and also offers greater flexibility in less demanding weather conditions. So the question shouldn’t be can you wear two base layers? but have you tried wearing two base layers?

  2. How to Choose Your Perfect Base Layer

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    How to Choose your Perfect Base Layer
    Keeping Warm

    Staying warm is incredibly important. Whether you are skiing in the Alps, enjoying the outdoors or just getting through the winter months, staying warm is essential.The key to warmth starts with a good base layer. But with all the different types available, it’s hard to understand what is right for you. That’s why we’ve put together this guide to choosing your perfect base layer.

    What are base layers?

    Base layers are the foundation layer of clothing, designed to provide temperature regulation. They should move moisture away from your skin, keeping you dry as you sweat and cool down while you rest. It’s important to understand that base layers are not insulation. They help regulate your temperature, but the clothes you layer on top will keep you warm.

    Choosing the right base layer

    When choosing the right base layer for you, there are many different factors to consider.

    Material
    Firstly, base layers can be made from different materials. The typical materials you can choose from are:

    • Cotton: Cotton is affordable, but is a bad base layer material. It can add a bit of warmth, but only if it’s heavy and thick. Cotton will also soak up any sweat or moisture, making it cold, clammy and uncomfortable to wear.
    • Silk: Feeling great on your skin, silk is great for layering under your clothes. Silk also works great when you need to squeeze into pieces of form-fitting clothing, such as shoes or a helmet. Unfortunately, silk is not great at regulating temperatures. In warm conditions, silk can be too hot or uncomfortable to wear.
    • Synthetic: There is a big range of synthetic materials used in base layers. In general, synthetic materials are breathable, dry incredibly fast and can add warmth. Most synthetics are not resistant to bacteria and can build odours.
    • Merino wool: This type of wool is very soft, great at regulating your temperature and resists odour. Coming from the New Zealand Merino sheep, this wool is a pricey option for some.

    Size
    Your base layer needs to be comfortable, but tight-fitting. Having a tight-fitting base layer traps air next to the skin, helping insulate and regulate your body temperature. It’s also a great idea for the shirts to be long enough to tuck into your trousers. This will avoid any cold spells while bending over, and help retain the trapped layer of air. Generally, most base layers are made to be tight-fitting. So, stick to your normal clothes size when ordering your base layer.

    Style
    Base layers can come in different styles, with short- and long-sleeve variations. The perfect style depends on your activity, climate and personal preferences. Generally, if you are exposed to colder conditions, long-sleeved based layers will be right for you. On the other hand, more active or warmer conditions will prefer shorter sleeves.

    Conclusion


    Choosing your perfect base layer depends ultimately on your unique needs, activity and weather conditions. Need more information on choosing your base layer? Our experts can help you choose your perfect option based on your unique requirements.

    Ready to choose your perfect base layer? Browse our selection today:

    https://www.subzerostore.co.uk/outdoor-clothing/baselayer-thermal-underwear/base-layers

     

  3. Bargain Thermal Underwear By Sub Zero This Winter

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    Bargain sub standard thermals by Sub Zero are an inexpensive way to keep warm this winter

    Take advantage of Sub Zero sub-standard bargain thermal underwear this winter for a real warming treat.

    Unlike the vast majority of outdoor thermal brands, here at Sub Zero we manufacture our own products in our own UK factory (Leicestershire). On very rare occasions during the production process, some garments have faults. If it is a manufacturing fault then these are normally rectified  before being re-examined and packed. If the fault cannot be mended then the garment is completed and then placed in to stock as a sub-standard – there will be no missing arms, huge holes or differences in sizing, they will work just as well as their perfect siblings.  In some circumstances the garment may be finished perfect but a fabric fault such as a pull, small stain or a slub found during the final examine process means we cannot sell them as perfect.

    To recoup some of our production and fabric costs, we sell these sub standard garments at a bargain price, usually around 60-75% off the recommended retail price. We are constantly updating the sub standard stock levels on sub zero store but the styles and colours available will be dependent on what we are manufacturing at that moment in time. If you cannot find what you are looking for then please keep checking on a regular basis as these sub-standards are popular and rarely stay in stock for a long period of time.

    Currently the most popular ranges in our sub-standard garments are the Factor 1 Plus thermal base layers and the Factor 2 thermal mid-layers. These are ideal for cold morning commutes or for walking the dog at night when the temperatures start to drop. If you are more adventurous then a combination of the two are ideal for winter mountaineering and cold weather expeditions.

  4. Find the perfect Christmas gift for explorers at Sub Zero Store

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    With Christmas less than 50 days away, Sub Zero Store have put together our top Christmas gift ideas for the 12 days of Christmas!

    Sub Zero’s fantastic range of thermal clothing means that outdoor enthusiasts will keep warm in any weather. Cycling, hiking, camping, whatever the pursuit, wherever in the world, Sub Zero’s adventure accessories are the perfect Christmas gift for explorers of all ages. And with free delivery when you spend £75, you don’t have to brave the elements yourself!

    Be inspired by our Christmas gift ideas below, or take a look at our website for stocking fillers and much more!

    Christmas gift for winter sports

    1. Factor 1 Plus Thermal Underwear Base Layer

    Warm base layers to wear under your clothes for maximum comfort during outdoor adventures!

    2. Factor 2 Mid Layer Thermal Underwear

    Warm mid layers to wear either over a base layer on a really cold day, or on their own on warmer days.

    3. Polar Thermal Fleece Body Warmers

    With a lambswool lining these fantastic unisex gilets are perfect for winter walks

    Christmas gift kids winter clothing4. Factor 3 Thermal Fleece Heavyweight Beanie Hat

    This fleece beanie hat offers unbeatable protection in extremely cold temperatures.

    5. Extremities Waterproof Sticky Power Liner Lightweight Thermal Gloves

    These waterproof gloves are perfect for snowy adventures such as skiing and snowboarding.

    6. Extremities Sticky Thinny Children’s Thermal Glove

    Snug, lightweight but still warm, these children’s gloves, wear underneath
    base and mid layers Christmas giftwaterproof gloves for sledging, skiing…and building snowmen!

    7. Extremities Long Wool Mountain Thermal Socks

    The classic Christmas gift… a pair of socks! One of the best thermal
    socks on the market, these are guaranteed to keep feet warm on the slopes.

    8. Primus Stainless Steel Vacuum Insulated Thermal Commuter Mug 400ml

    Guaranteed to keep your drinks warm with no spills, even when turned upside down! Available in black, white or red and great for commuters on-the-go or people who work outdoors.

    Christmas gift for cyclists9. Lifeventure Ultra Lightweight Titanium Mug 450ml

    Made from high quality titanium alloy, this generously sized mug is an essential
    piece of kit for anybody who needs to keep weight and bulk to a minimum. Use
    as a cup or as a saucepan, this mug is great for camping or trekking.

    10. Lifeventure Ultra Lightweight Titanium Forkspoon

    This spoon and fork combination (affectionately known as a ‘spork’) is perfect for camping or backpacking when space is tight!

    11. Littlelife Toddler Dinosaur Daysack With Safety Rein

    Christmas giftLittle ones will love keeping their toys safe in these brilliant dino themed day sacks… and the added safety features will be a hit with parents too!

    12. Lifesystems Ultralight Intensity 220 LED Pocket Torch

    7 times brighter than a normal torch, the high power unbreakable CREE LED bulb and long-life lithium batteries, make this is the ultimate pocket torch. With an added SOS function, this gadget offers extra protection when on the hills
    at night or in low-light visibility.

    These are just a few of our Christmas gift ideas, take a look around subzerostore.co.uk for even more inspiration!

    Merry Christmas from Sub Zero Store!

  5. New Base Layer Zip Turtle Design By Sub Zero

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    Sub Zero Factor 1 Plus Long Sleeve Zip Turtle Thermal Base Layer Aqua

     

    Sub Zero Factor 1 Plus Long Sleeve Zip Turtle Thermal Base Layer is a new addition to the award winning range.

    New developments in seamless knitting technology have enable Sub Zero to add a lightweight 18cm (7″) long zip to a garment based on the ever popular Factor 1 Plus Long Sleeve top design.  This new base layer top features an innovative seamless body construction that incorporates stretch rib zones for enhanced support and waffle zones for increased thermal efficiency. During the dyeing process, a hydrophilic treatment is pressure injected in to the yarn, increasing the wicking rate of the fabric, allowing much greater control of perspiration. The stand-up double thickness turtle will protect your neck during outer activities – an area of the body that is often left exposed when wearing other base layers. The zip used in the turtle is lightweight to prevent ‘zip ripple’ when done up, and the fabric chin guard will protect your face from zip puller rub. If you do get too hot when wearing the base layer then lowering the zip will give extra aeration (t also helps the wearer to get the garment over the head) . Integrated thumb holes in the cuff of the sleeves protect your hands on cooler days and allows you to wear snug outer jackets without your sleeves riding up.

    These new Sub Zero thermal zip turtle base layers are ideal for outdoor activities in the autumn and winter where extra protection of the neck is required, such as when winter walking, cycling, hiking and climbing. For greater insulation in the depths of winter, why not try this Zip Turtle base layer with the Sub Zero Factor 2 mid layer range. Used in combination, this layering system will keep you snug, dry and ready for your winter adventure.

    The new Factor 1 Plus Zip Turtle range currently comes in two colours, black and aqua blue, and in sizes XSmall -XXLarge.

     

  6. New Stone Pillars On Snowdon

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    To encourage walkers to follow the correct footpaths on Snowdon and in order to reduce the number of call-outs to the local mountain rescue team, a number of distinctive stone pillars, recycled from local disused buildings, will be strategically placed on the mountain this summer.

    In recent years, it has become evident from Llanberis Mountain Rescue Team’s reports that walkers tend to get into difficulties in the same places on Snowdon. As a result, and following detailed discussions with Snowdonia’s MountainSafe Partnership and with the full support of the Northern Snowdonia Local Access Forum, the Authority has decided that setting stone pillars will be more sustainable and less obtrusive than ordinary signage.

    The initial phase of the project entails setting one stone pillar at the foot of each of the six main paths up Snowdon with the name of the path etched on its surface. This will then be followed by setting other stone pillars in places which have proven to be problematic for walkers in the past. Therefore, for safety reasons only, stone pillars will be placed to mark Bwlch y Moch and Crib Goch to encourage people not to go along these routes by mistake, another stone pillar will be placed to identify the intersection of Llanberis Path and Snowdon Ranger Path as walkers often mix up the two paths. Also, a stone pillar will be placed on the summit to identify accurately where the Watkin Path begins and another stone pillar to identify Bwlch y Saethau as walkers often make the mistake of descending the mountain this dangerous way.

    Mair Huws, Head of Wardens and Access at the National Park Authority explained the scheme further, “Obviously, we can’t ignore all the incidents that occur on Snowdon. Erecting signs all over Snowdon is not acceptable, therefore placing these stone pillars on the mountain is sustainable, it is a convenient way to keep people informed without being intrusive, and will not affect people’s enjoyment of the mountain. By placing them in this way, our hope is to create as little impact on the landscape and the atmosphere of the mountain as possible, encouraging walkers to be safe and responsible at the same time.”

    The Snowdon Paths are the Llanberis Path, Rhyd-Ddu Path, Snowdon Ranger Path, Watkin Path, Miners Track and the PYG Track. More information about the footpaths can be found on the Authority’s website, www.eryri-npa.gov.uk.

     

    Of course, don’t rely on signs to navigate around the mountain. Keep your map and compass handy and to make sure your rucksack is packed with:

     

  7. Fort William Mountain Festival 2013

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    The full programme for the 2013 Fort William Mountain Festival has an impressive and diverse line up of inspirational speakers made up of top climbers, mountaineers and extreme sports men and women, together with adventure film screenings and mountain workshops. This year’s festival will be staged in and around the bustling Highland town of Fort William, in the heart of Lochaber, The Outdoor Capital of the UK, from Thursday 21 to Sunday 24 February 2013.

    This year’s programme celebrates mountain culture in all its forms and promotes the mountains as an attractive, accessible and above all enjoyable place to be. It caters for a wide spectrum of enthusiasts from armchair adventurers to climbers and mountaineers to mountain bikers and budding wildlife photographers.”

    There will also be plenty of opportunity for both novices and experts to hone their mountain skills through a series of workshops in avalanche awareness, winter walking and winter climbing with Abacus Mountaineering; there is a one-off Climbing Technique Master Class with local climber Dave MacLeod.  There will be mountain photography workshops with Nevispix and a two day outdoor emergency first aid course at the Snowgoose Mountain Centre. Indoor climbing and ice climbing skills workshops will also be on offer at Kinlochleven’s Ice Factor Indoor Climbing Centre. There is even a Gaelic language workshop aimed at climbers, mountaineers and hillwalkers at the West Highland College, UHI, entitled ‘Understanding our mountains through the Gaelic language’.

    With the way the 2013 winter has developed, visitors will need to ensure they’re dressed to cope with demanding weather conditions as well as having the right equipment and skills to make the most of this outstanding area. Base and mid  layer thermal underwear are the foundation of dressing comfortably for the winter hills, topped off with insulating layers – fleece, synthetic fill and down – under an outer shell that is, at least, windproof plus a hat and gloves. All winter hill walkers should carry extra clothing, food and a torch, of course, as well as an ice axe, crampons and navigation – plus know how tom use them!

    To find out more and to buy festival tickets go to – www.mountainfestival.co.uk/

     

     

     

  8. Sub Zero Merino Wool Base Layer Wins TGO Recommended

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    Sub Zero mens merino wool base layer worn by a mountaineer in the Alps

     

    In the February 2013 issue of The Great Outdoors Magazine (TGO), Chris Townsend picks out the best base layers for winter hill walking.  Our Sub Zero Merino wool base layer thermals were tested by Chris and received 4.5 /5 stars and were highly recommended.

    These merino wool base layers are produced from premium Spanish merino wool spun around a Lycra core for increased robustness, superior washing properties, and greater stretch providing a much closer fit.

    The manufacturing process takes place on Shima Seiki seamless machines that sees the whole garment knitted without seams – it basically falls of the knitting machine finished. All we have to do is apply the heat seal logo and a neck tab with the washing instruction.

    Merino Wool Base Layer Review

    Chris Towsend writes:

    “This close-fitting, warm and comfortable top is by far the lightest merino wool garment tested and also the only garment made in the UK. It’s quite compact as well and so suitable for carrying in the pack as a spare or for camp wear. It’s also unusual in that it’s completely seamless, being made with a process called ‘whole body ‘ knitting.

    The front and back are plain knit while the sides, shoulders and sleeves are rib knit, which makes them very stretchy. Combined with a little Lycra this makes for a garment that hugs the body without being restrictive. This close fit makes the top quite warm even though the wool is quite thin.

    The sleeves have thumb loops and extend over the backs of the hands so there is on gap with gloves and they can’t ride up. The sleeves can be pushed up in warm weather, There’s an extended back and the top as a whole is longer than most so there’s no chance of it separating from your trousers.”

     

  9. Packing Your Rucksack For Autumn Walks

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    Everybody has their own preferences on what to carry for a day’s walking, depending on experience, activity, season and terrain but there are some items that everybody should carry in their rucksack:

    • Spare thermal underwear – it might be mild in the valley but wind and elevation cause the temperature to drop and mountain weather is notoriously fickle, so be prepared.
    • Thermal hat and thermal gloves – great for quickly adjusting warmth and comfort without fuss.
    • Hydration – water bottle and, perhaps, a thermal flask for a hot drink.
    • First aid kit – add any medication you need to the kit and top up items used. Even if you don’t feel the need to carry one, there’s no telling what you might encounter in the hills.
    • Lighting – nobody wants to become benighted on a walk but it happens; carrying a torch or head torch is an essential – make sure to check the battery life.

  10. Top Clothing Tips For Outdoor Winter Activities

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    In the depths of winter, it’s obvious to think carefully about dressing for a day in the hills. That’s when snow, cold and wind are on the agenda. However, whilst snow on the tops in summer is highly unlikely, hillwalkers still need to dress sensibly.

    ‘Sensibly’ means much more than avoiding the shorts and sandals scenarios that crop up regularly in mountain rescue stories. It means having a flexible combination of clothing that can cope easily with changing weather conditions and varying levels of exertion, allowing you can be in control of managing your body temperature. Plus, of course, it means being comfortable throughout the day whether slogging up a mountain track or being battered by the wind on an open ridge. The trick is to balance layers to ensure adjustable warmth and protection, levelling out the extremes of over-heating and shivering with cold to achieve a happy equilibrium.

    Being next to your skin, base layers are not just about warmth. By drawing sweat through their fibres to evaporate they avoid becoming damp, cold and uncomfortable. Depending on the time of year, different weights offer a variety of comfort options and, of course, they can be worn on their own in mild conditions. In cold conditions, thermal base layers ensure good retention of body heat. Relatively new, cooling base layers not only whisk sweat away but also help to avoid overheating as they have low heat retention.

    The mid layer is all about insulation, trapping warm air to maintain your core body temperature; options include fleece as well as goose down and synthetic fills, such as Primaloft. Zips allow ventilation and, even on a sunny day, a warm top should packed in your rucksack as a pleasant outlook in the valley could turn out very different a few hundred feet higher up.

    The outer layer protects you from the elements. Rain is the obvious offender but wind can whip heat away and chill you to the bone so being windproof is a key consideration. ‘Softshell’ tops are not completely waterproof but are windproof, stretchy and can cope with a wide range of wet weather.

    If you want to make sure you never suffer from cold feet again then slip on a pair of thermal over socks. Finally, don’t forget hats and gloves. Quickly slipped on and off, they allow conservation or loss of body heat to be adjusted easily. Keep them handy in pockets rather than buried in your rucksack.

    With your plans made and dressed sensibly, don’t forget to let a responsible person know where you’re going and when you expect to return. Let them know when you do get back to avoid needless call-outs for mountain rescue teams.

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