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  1. Winter Expedition Equipment Help

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    Winter Expedition Equipment Help By Sub Zero

    Winter Expedition Essentials

    Choosing winter expedition equipment for the first time can be tough. As with all forms of mountaineering, hiking, walking or camping, packing depends on where you are heading to and how long you are going for.

    As winter is one of the harshest times to go out exploring there are certain necessities you’ll need if you’re daring to head out into the wilderness. Certain equipment deserves space in every pack. You won’t need every item on every trip, but essential equipment can be a lifesaver in an emergency.

    It can be quite stressful knowing what to pack and when, so, luckily, we’ve compiled this handy little list of all the essentials you’ll need for your next winter expedition!

    1. Navigation

    Winter expedition waterproof map cases and pouchesWhatever season you’re going out in, you must know where you are, where you’re going, and how to get back. Always carry a detailed topographic map of the area you are visiting, and place it in a protective case or plastic covering. Always carry a compass too!

    We have a range of different waterproof pouches that are perfect for keeping your navigation equipment safe and dry in all weathers. The thick plastic film and airtight closure system protects the contents from any water penetration, even to depths of up to 10 metres.

    And if you are separated from your party, which can easily happen, a whistle can be a simple but reliable signalling device, so it’s worthwhile packing one.

    1. Insulation

    Winter expedition insulating clothing by Sub ZeroA basic expedition outfit includes inner and outer socks, boots, underwear, trousers, shirt, sweater or fleece jacket, hat, mittens or gloves, and raingear. However, it’s always a good idea to wear a little bit more insulation, just in case!

    When packing, always ask yourself this question: ‘What is needed to survive the worst conditions that could realistically be encountered on this trip?’

    An extra layer of long underwear can add much warmth while adding little weight to a pack. It is also wise to pack an extra hat or balaclava, because they provide more warmth for their weight than any other article of clothing. For your feet, bring an extra pair of thick socks, and for your hands, an extra pair of polyester or fleece mitts. Pack extra tops to keep your torso warm, plus insulated trousers too!

     

     

    1. Illumination

    Winter expedition torches and lampsIt’s essential to carry a headlamp or flashlight, just in case. Batteries and bulbs do not last forever, so always carry spares, pack more than you think you need.

    We offer a range of different lighting options to choose from, from headlights you can wear, LED lanterns, and gas lanterns ensuring you have perfect visibility.

    Remember, there are less daylight hours in the winter, so carrying a light with you is always important.

     

     

     

    1. First-Aid Supplies

    Winter expedition first aid kitsCarry and know how to use a first-aid kit, but do not let a first-aid kit give you a false sense of security. The best course of action is to always take the steps necessary to avoid injury or sickness in the first place.

    Your first-aid kit should be compact and sturdy, with the contents wrapped in waterproof packaging. At a minimum, a first-aid kit should include gauze pads in various sizes, roller gauze, small adhesive bandages, butterfly bandages, triangular bandages, battle dressing, adhesive tape, scissors, cleansers or soap, latex gloves, and paper and pencil.

    Consider the length and nature of your trip when deciding what to add to your first aid kit. If you’re travelling on glaciers, for example, there may be no trees arounds to be used as improvised splints. Therefore, bringing a wire ladder splint would be extremely valuable in the event of a fracture.

     

    1. Nutrition and Hydration

    Winter expedition water bottles and purifiers The length of your trip will depend on what food and water you’ll take on your winter expedition. However, you must pack for every eventuality, so always take more than you think you need.

    The food should require no cooking, be easily digestible, and store well for prolonged periods. A combination of dried meat such as jerky, nuts, chocolate, granola, and dried fruit works well. If you’re taking a stove, hot chocolate, dried soup, and tea can be added.

    Carrying sufficient water and the equipment to purify any additional water is also important. Always carry at least one water bottle or collapsible water sack. Widemouthed containers are easier to refill.

    Travel water purification chemicals are based on the halogen element chlorine, either as chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite, or solid chlorine. Being a strong oxidant, chlorine rapidly kills harmful micro-organisms in water like bacteria, viruses and cysts, including Giardia and Cryptosporidium. These travel water purification chemicals come in either liquid or tablet form and are lightweight and easy to carry. Just follow the instructions on the packs to quickly produce sterile clean drinking water. We stock a variety of water purifying kits, just check our site!

    An accessory pocket makes it possible to carry a water bottle on a pack hip-belt for easy access. Some water sacks (hydration bladders) designed to be stored in the pack feature a plastic hose and valve that allow drinking without slowing your pace.

    In cold environments, a stove, fuel, pot, and lighter are needed to melt snow for additional water.

     

    1. A tent/shelter

    Winter expedition tarps and sheltersIf your winter expedition will last more than a day trip, it’s paramount that you carry some sort of shelter (in addition to a rain shell) from rain and wind, such as a plastic tube tent or a jumbo plastic bin bag. Another possibility is a reflective emergency blanket, which can also be used in administering first aid to an injured or hypothermic person.

    Carry an insulated sleeping pad too, to reduce heat loss while sitting or lying on snow.

    We have lots of different tarps that are lightweight to pack, easy to assemble and provide wind and rain shelter from your camp and tent. Keeping you warm and dry.

     

     

  2. Lifesystems First Aid Kit Video – Helping You Make The Right Decision

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     Lifesystems First Aid Kit Video is an invaluable tool to help you make the right decision when purchasing a first aid kit.

    The short YouTube video guides you through the Lifesystem range, highlighting the major differences between the packs and what you should be looking for in a good quality first aid kit.

     

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    No matter what activity you are going to partake in the great outdoors, there is a Lifesystem First Aid Kit for you.

  3. Tackle Your Favourite Mountain For WaterAid

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    Missing the Olympics? Looking for a new sporting challenge in 2013? Or simply want to get out there and enjoy the countryside? International charity, WaterAid, is calling on walkers and climbers of all levels to ‘conquer’ their favourite local mountain and raise vital funds to provide access to clean water and sanitation to rural communities in Nepal.

    Join over 2,000 other climbers taking part in the 2013 WaterAid200 challenge on the 8th June and take on your chosen mountain to raise money for the charity. The challenge aims to put a different team on top of 200 different mountains in the UK and Ireland while raising over £200,000 to help fund work to improve access to safe water and sanitation in mountainous Nepal.

    WaterAid200 includes some of the UK and Ireland’s best-loved peaks including those in the Scottish Highlands, the Lake and Peak Districts and Wales as well as lesser-known but equally stunning sites in the South of England.  Visit www.wateraid200.org to find out more about the challenge, sign-up and claim your favourite peak.

    Anna McGuire, Senior Events Officer at WaterAid, said, “By taking part in WaterAid 200 you can know that with every step, you are helping others to climb out of poverty by providing access to safe water and sanitation and reducing the time spent collecting water each day in one of the most mountainous regions of the world. You don’t need to be a mountaineer or experienced climber to take part – with climbs that range from gentle slopes to steep scrambles and  take in some of the best views  (and pubs!) across the UK and Ireland, there really is a peak for everyone!”

    Although we’re all hoping for great summer weather, conditions in the hills can change rapidly and walkers have to be prepared for the worst. On a bright, sunny day, it’s tempting to head off in shorts and T-shirt but it’s important to be prepared for the worst so bear in mind our advice for charity walkers.

    The key to comfort is flexible layers of clothing – a baselayer to shift moisture away from your skin where it would chill as it cools; a mid layer for insulating warmth and an outer layer that will offer protection from wind, rain and snow. Don’t forget the instant flexibility offered by a hat and thermal gloves. Avoid overheating by sticking to a comfortable pace and letting heat escape by quick simple ventilation options such as opening zips and cuffs and whipping off your hat.

    In your rucksack, a water bottle, food, snacks, basic first aid kit, survival bag and a head torch (check the batteries) are the bare essentials. A map and compass or GPS should be handy and in use whilst a safety whistle should be easy to reach.

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