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  1. Winter Expedition Equipment Help

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    Winter Expedition Equipment Help By Sub Zero

    Winter Expedition Essentials

    Choosing winter expedition equipment for the first time can be tough. As with all forms of mountaineering, hiking, walking or camping, packing depends on where you are heading to and how long you are going for.

    As winter is one of the harshest times to go out exploring there are certain necessities you’ll need if you’re daring to head out into the wilderness. Certain equipment deserves space in every pack. You won’t need every item on every trip, but essential equipment can be a lifesaver in an emergency.

    It can be quite stressful knowing what to pack and when, so, luckily, we’ve compiled this handy little list of all the essentials you’ll need for your next winter expedition!

    1. Navigation

    Winter expedition waterproof map cases and pouchesWhatever season you’re going out in, you must know where you are, where you’re going, and how to get back. Always carry a detailed topographic map of the area you are visiting, and place it in a protective case or plastic covering. Always carry a compass too!

    We have a range of different waterproof pouches that are perfect for keeping your navigation equipment safe and dry in all weathers. The thick plastic film and airtight closure system protects the contents from any water penetration, even to depths of up to 10 metres.

    And if you are separated from your party, which can easily happen, a whistle can be a simple but reliable signalling device, so it’s worthwhile packing one.

    1. Insulation

    Winter expedition insulating clothing by Sub ZeroA basic expedition outfit includes inner and outer socks, boots, underwear, trousers, shirt, sweater or fleece jacket, hat, mittens or gloves, and raingear. However, it’s always a good idea to wear a little bit more insulation, just in case!

    When packing, always ask yourself this question: ‘What is needed to survive the worst conditions that could realistically be encountered on this trip?’

    An extra layer of long underwear can add much warmth while adding little weight to a pack. It is also wise to pack an extra hat or balaclava, because they provide more warmth for their weight than any other article of clothing. For your feet, bring an extra pair of thick socks, and for your hands, an extra pair of polyester or fleece mitts. Pack extra tops to keep your torso warm, plus insulated trousers too!

     

     

    1. Illumination

    Winter expedition torches and lampsIt’s essential to carry a headlamp or flashlight, just in case. Batteries and bulbs do not last forever, so always carry spares, pack more than you think you need.

    We offer a range of different lighting options to choose from, from headlights you can wear, LED lanterns, and gas lanterns ensuring you have perfect visibility.

    Remember, there are less daylight hours in the winter, so carrying a light with you is always important.

     

     

     

    1. First-Aid Supplies

    Winter expedition first aid kitsCarry and know how to use a first-aid kit, but do not let a first-aid kit give you a false sense of security. The best course of action is to always take the steps necessary to avoid injury or sickness in the first place.

    Your first-aid kit should be compact and sturdy, with the contents wrapped in waterproof packaging. At a minimum, a first-aid kit should include gauze pads in various sizes, roller gauze, small adhesive bandages, butterfly bandages, triangular bandages, battle dressing, adhesive tape, scissors, cleansers or soap, latex gloves, and paper and pencil.

    Consider the length and nature of your trip when deciding what to add to your first aid kit. If you’re travelling on glaciers, for example, there may be no trees arounds to be used as improvised splints. Therefore, bringing a wire ladder splint would be extremely valuable in the event of a fracture.

     

    1. Nutrition and Hydration

    Winter expedition water bottles and purifiers The length of your trip will depend on what food and water you’ll take on your winter expedition. However, you must pack for every eventuality, so always take more than you think you need.

    The food should require no cooking, be easily digestible, and store well for prolonged periods. A combination of dried meat such as jerky, nuts, chocolate, granola, and dried fruit works well. If you’re taking a stove, hot chocolate, dried soup, and tea can be added.

    Carrying sufficient water and the equipment to purify any additional water is also important. Always carry at least one water bottle or collapsible water sack. Widemouthed containers are easier to refill.

    Travel water purification chemicals are based on the halogen element chlorine, either as chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite, or solid chlorine. Being a strong oxidant, chlorine rapidly kills harmful micro-organisms in water like bacteria, viruses and cysts, including Giardia and Cryptosporidium. These travel water purification chemicals come in either liquid or tablet form and are lightweight and easy to carry. Just follow the instructions on the packs to quickly produce sterile clean drinking water. We stock a variety of water purifying kits, just check our site!

    An accessory pocket makes it possible to carry a water bottle on a pack hip-belt for easy access. Some water sacks (hydration bladders) designed to be stored in the pack feature a plastic hose and valve that allow drinking without slowing your pace.

    In cold environments, a stove, fuel, pot, and lighter are needed to melt snow for additional water.

     

    1. A tent/shelter

    Winter expedition tarps and sheltersIf your winter expedition will last more than a day trip, it’s paramount that you carry some sort of shelter (in addition to a rain shell) from rain and wind, such as a plastic tube tent or a jumbo plastic bin bag. Another possibility is a reflective emergency blanket, which can also be used in administering first aid to an injured or hypothermic person.

    Carry an insulated sleeping pad too, to reduce heat loss while sitting or lying on snow.

    We have lots of different tarps that are lightweight to pack, easy to assemble and provide wind and rain shelter from your camp and tent. Keeping you warm and dry.

     

     

  2. Can You Wear Two Base Layers?

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    Can you wear two base layers? - Sub Zero Factor 1 and All Active worn by a female hiker

    At first glance of the question, Can you wear two base layers? You immediately think yes you can but why would you want to? Most outdoors people are well versed in the principles of the layering system – base layer, insulating mid layer, protective outer layer – so why would you ignore this and just wear two base layers. The problem is that in certain situations this layering system can be impractical.

    BASE LAYERS FOR AEROBIC EXERCISE

    If you are going to take part in a high intensity aerobic exercise in winter such as rowing, it is unfeasible to wear lots of different clothing layers. For a start you are going to get warm very quickly as well as producing a lot of perspiration.  You are also going to need full range of movement which will be hampered with a traditional layering system. Plus there is also the problem of storing all these different clothes when removed.

    What a lot of professional rowing teams practice in winter is wearing two thermal base layers at the start of a days training programme. Without being restrictive, these thermal layers will keep you warm whilst also managing perspiration more efficiently. Once the warm up is complete, one of the base layers is removed and easily stored in the bottom of the boat. At the cool down, the discarded base layer can be worn again to reduce rapid cooling.

    Even in the coolness of early summer mornings a two layer base layer system is often used. Next to the skin will be worn a summer base layer to manage perspiration, with a thermal base layer as a second layer to provide extra warmth during the warm up.

    BASE LAYERS FOR SPRING AND AUTUMN WEATHER

    Out of the winter season, the need for a full thermal layering system is usually unnecessary. With the temperatures very rarely reaching freezing, you should be able to get away with just wearing your base layer. However, some early mornings and evenings may see temperatures drop low enough to require wearing extra layers for a boost in warmth. You could pack a thermal mid layer on the off chance, but it is a lot of unnecessary weight to carry.

    Instead, ensure you are carrying a second base layer – you should be carrying a spare set anyway if you are heading away from civilisation. They can easily be worn over your first base layer and are light enough to be stored in a small rucksack.

    BASE LAYERS FOR EXTREME COLD ENVIRONMENTS

    When it comes to very cold weather, such as found in the polar regions or the Himalayas, mountaineers and explorers will often wear more than one base layer as part of their layering system. The main reason for this is you can trap more air between thin layers than wearing bulky insulating layers. And trapping air is essential if you want to keep warm because air is the insulator, not the fabric.  It is not uncommon for mountaineers to wear two or even three base layers beneath their insulating mid layer.

    SO CAN YOU WEAR TWO BASE LAYERS?

    Instead of being a bit of a wacky question there are certain situations where wearing two base layers can actually be desirable. It is a lightweight alternative to heavier insulating mid layers and also offers greater flexibility in less demanding weather conditions. So the question shouldn’t be can you wear two base layers? but have you tried wearing two base layers?

  3. How Tight Should Base Layers Be?

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    How tight should base layers be? - Sub Zero Factor 1 Plus base layer zip turtle top being worn correctly by a skier

     

    The two most common questions we get asked are how tight should base layers be? and what is the difference between base layers and compression layers? We will deal with the latter question in the next few weeks , but this post will hopefully enlighten you on the correct way to wear base layers.

    ARE BASE LAYERS SUPPOSED TO BE TIGHT?

    The simple answer is it depends on your definition of tight. To me, tight means restrictive and uncomfortable, which is obviously a hindrance and a distraction when performing an outdoor activity. It has entered the vocabulary of performance clothing as the dividing line between base layers and compression layers has become blurred by marketeers. We try and avoid using ‘tight’ altogether when talking to our customers, preferring a more softer wording such as ‘snug’.

    WHY NOT WEAR BAGGY BASE LAYERS?

    This is the other extreme. You may think you look cool with your bum hanging out your base layer leggings (obviously a matter of opinion) but they won’t keep you warm. Badly fitting thermals will lead to all sorts of problems such as heat loss, vastly reduced wicking rates (transportation of moisture), and possible skin sores from rubbing of excess material.

    HOW SHOULD BASE LAYERS FIT?

    Base layers need to be close fitting to prevent warm air trapped between your clothing from being wafted out during movement. A close fitting base layer will also be much more efficient at moisture management due to a higher fabric surface area being in close contact with your skin.

    When trying on a base layer you need to understand that the fabric has been designed to be stretchy so it will naturally adjust to most body shapes. What you should be looking for is the correct length in the arms (finishing just over the wrist) and the length of the body resting on the top of your bottom.

    A good way to check  if the base layer is too tight is to see if you can pinch any of the fabric and pull it away from your body. If this is difficult to do then you more than likely have a size too small. Another area to check is under the armpits. If you cannot get the full rolling movement of your arms and shoulders then you need to try the next size up.

    SO HOW TIGHT SHOULD BASE LAYERS BE?

    In answer to the original question, base layers should be snug fitting but not restrictive. Warm air needs to be trapped between fabric layers without the possibility of it being wafted out if you are to stay warm – the air is the insulator. At the same time, you don’t want the base layer to be so skin tight that it restricts movement or even blood flow.

    So my final piece of advice is if it feels too tight then it probably is.

  4. Thermal Clothing For Extreme Cold

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    Two arctic explorers in full Sub Zero thermal clothing for extreme cold weather

     

    Wearing the right layer of thermal clothing for extreme cold situations can be the difference between life and death if you get in trouble. Wear too much insulation and you will overheat, increasing your perspiration, that will rapidly cool your body when your intensity levels drop. Alternatively you may not be wearing enough thermal layers to start with. This can also lead to rapid heat loss unless remedied, forcing your body to shut down to protect its vital organs. As you can see, wearing the correct layers of thermal clothing for extreme cold environments should be taken very seriously.

    BASE LAYER

    Base layers are the first line of defence against the cold. Worn directly next to the skin, they need to be soft to prevent rubbing sores from carrying equipment, offer thermal resistance to trap heat, and be effective at transporting perspiration away from the body. They are one of the most important layers of thermal clothing for extreme cold environments.

    Our Sub Zero Factor 1 Plus base layers are made form super soft polyamide yarn that has lots of in-built stretch. This allows the base layer to fit the body snugly like a second skin. A water loving chemical is also impregnated in to the yarn during the dyeing process that actively transports moisture way from the skin to the outer layers. This keeps you dry and also speeds up the drying process when washed.

    MID LAYER

    Mid layers are very similar to base layers in that they should be worn close fitting, but they contain more fibres to trap warm air – insulation. They are effectively the work horse in your range of thermal clothing for extreme cold.

    Our Sub Zero Factor 2 thermal mid layers are heavily brushed on the inside fabric face to produce an inner fleece layer that insulates your body from excess heat loss. Their very strong flat seam construction helps prevent any pressure points occurring when carrying kit.

    OUTER LAYER

    Once you have your base layer and insulation mid layer sorted then your choice of outer layer is often determined by the elements.

    If you are working hard and still feel a little cool then putting on a lightweight down jacket will help to add extra insulation without adding much extra weight as a burden.

    If you are comfortably warm then you may not even need an outer layer at that point in time but you should keep a close eye on the weather and anticipate changes in conditions. Likewise, if you have to stop or your activity levels decrease then you will need to add further layers to compensate for the reduction in heat generation.

    One mistake that even the professionals sometimes get wrong is underestimating the power of wind chill on your bodies temperature. It may look lovely and sunny outside but any wind can rapidly cool the body. Carrying a lightweight windproof that can quickly be thrown over your under layers should mitigate a lot of the wind chill effects.

    For further information on wind chill visit the Met Office

    HATS & GLOVES

    It is a myth that you loose most of your body heat through your head, at most it is around 10%. Even though the percentage is a lot lower than most people think, it is a good way to fine tune your bodies temperature. If you start to get a bit warm, remove your fleece hat or balaclava. If you are still warm after a few more minutes of doing this then you know you need to remove a larger layer of clothing.

    This also works the other way around. Add a hat if you start to feel cool. If this dosen’t warm you up then you know that a larger item of clothing needs to be worn or that you need to start looking for shelter.

    The other reason for covering your head and hands is to help protect your extremities from wind burn and frost bite.

    THERMAL CLOTHING FOR EXTREME COLD

    Keeping warm and dry in extreme cold weather needn’t be too much of a problem if you listen to what your body is telling you , are aware of your surroundings, and are wearing the correct kit.

    Luckily Sub Zero have over 40 years experience manufacturing thermal clothing for extreme cold conditions, with many polar explorers and mountaineers placing their trust in our products.

  5. How to Choose Your Perfect Base Layer

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    How to Choose your Perfect Base Layer
    Keeping Warm

    Staying warm is incredibly important. Whether you are skiing in the Alps, enjoying the outdoors or just getting through the winter months, staying warm is essential.The key to warmth starts with a good base layer. But with all the different types available, it’s hard to understand what is right for you. That’s why we’ve put together this guide to choosing your perfect base layer.

    What are base layers?

    Base layers are the foundation layer of clothing, designed to provide temperature regulation. They should move moisture away from your skin, keeping you dry as you sweat and cool down while you rest. It’s important to understand that base layers are not insulation. They help regulate your temperature, but the clothes you layer on top will keep you warm.

    Choosing the right base layer

    When choosing the right base layer for you, there are many different factors to consider.

    Material
    Firstly, base layers can be made from different materials. The typical materials you can choose from are:

    • Cotton: Cotton is affordable, but is a bad base layer material. It can add a bit of warmth, but only if it’s heavy and thick. Cotton will also soak up any sweat or moisture, making it cold, clammy and uncomfortable to wear.
    • Silk: Feeling great on your skin, silk is great for layering under your clothes. Silk also works great when you need to squeeze into pieces of form-fitting clothing, such as shoes or a helmet. Unfortunately, silk is not great at regulating temperatures. In warm conditions, silk can be too hot or uncomfortable to wear.
    • Synthetic: There is a big range of synthetic materials used in base layers. In general, synthetic materials are breathable, dry incredibly fast and can add warmth. Most synthetics are not resistant to bacteria and can build odours.
    • Merino wool: This type of wool is very soft, great at regulating your temperature and resists odour. Coming from the New Zealand Merino sheep, this wool is a pricey option for some.

    Size
    Your base layer needs to be comfortable, but tight-fitting. Having a tight-fitting base layer traps air next to the skin, helping insulate and regulate your body temperature. It’s also a great idea for the shirts to be long enough to tuck into your trousers. This will avoid any cold spells while bending over, and help retain the trapped layer of air. Generally, most base layers are made to be tight-fitting. So, stick to your normal clothes size when ordering your base layer.

    Style
    Base layers can come in different styles, with short- and long-sleeve variations. The perfect style depends on your activity, climate and personal preferences. Generally, if you are exposed to colder conditions, long-sleeved based layers will be right for you. On the other hand, more active or warmer conditions will prefer shorter sleeves.

    Conclusion


    Choosing your perfect base layer depends ultimately on your unique needs, activity and weather conditions. Need more information on choosing your base layer? Our experts can help you choose your perfect option based on your unique requirements.

    Ready to choose your perfect base layer? Browse our selection today:

    https://www.subzerostore.co.uk/outdoor-clothing/baselayer-thermal-underwear/base-layers

     

  6. Washing Synthetic Base Layers Correctly

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    Washing base layers correctly guide by Sub Zero

    Synthetic Base Layers

    As the name implies, synthetic base layers are those that are manufactured from any man-made fibres. These will usually be fabrics knitted from yarns of polyamide, polyester or polypropylene, and sometimes a combination of two or more. Sometimes a bit of acrylic is also used but these are usually on cheap products that probably will not make it past a few washes anyway. If you have a base layer that is a blended yarn of both natural and man made fibres then you need to take extra care and follow the care label precisely.

    Follow The Manufacturers Instructions

    Care labels on base layers are there for a reason, to be followed. They are not rough guidelines for you to interpret how you wish. They provide instructions for the maximum levels of certain processes such as wash temperature, and processes that shouldn’t be used, such as ironing and dry cleaning. Below are three scans of care labels for different synthetic base layer fabrics. As you can see they all look similar but the washing instructions and care instructions are slightly different:

    Washing Instruction Labels For Base Layers

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    For a handy guide to wash care symbols please visit the Love Your Clothes website

    Dry Cleaning

    A big no no when it comes to synthetic base layers. The harsh chemicals used in the cleaning process will strip out any treatments on the yarn such as softeners and hydrophilics, and the drying process can lead to shrinking and melt spots.

    Detergents And Fabric Softeners

    Washing detergents can be used on most base layersUsing detergents are a bit of a grey area as it depends on the yarn content of your synthetic base layers:

    Polyamide base layers, such as Sub Zero Factor 1, have a hydrophilic chemical treatment pressure injected directly in to the yarn during the dyeing and finishing process. It is not everlasting but it takes a very long time for the treatment to be washed out, even when using fabric detergents.

    Polypropylene base layers very rarely have any treatments applied to them due to the yarns properties so washing machine detergents can be happily used on them.

    Polyester base layers often have softeners and hydrophilic treatments applied to the outside of the yarn. These are easily stripped out by washing detergents so you may need to treat them every few washes with a dedicated base layer treatment wash.

    Fabric softeners on the other hand shouldn’t be used on any synthetic base layers. They coat the fibres with a waxy finish that affects their moisture transportation capabilities. If you should use a fabric softener by mistake, then just rewash the base layer with a normal detergent.

    Separating Colours

    It is always a good idea to separate light colours from dark colours in any wash if you want your whites to stay bright. Some clothing colours will leach in a wash leading to colouration of lighter garments if mixed together, especially base layers manufactured from polyamide yarn. Polypropylene base layers are usually resilient as they do not absorb any moisture, so can be mixed with different colours. If you are in any doubt, then use a colour absorbing sheet in your wash.

    Washing Loads

    If you are intending to mix garment styles in a single wash then be aware of the possible consequences. Any jacket or trousers with either a zip or Velcro fastenings could potentially damage your base layer during the washing process. The hooked harsh face of Velcro can be especially damaging as it catches the base layers fine filaments and can lead to pulls and ladders. It is always a good idea to wash Velcro and zip containing clothing separately.

    Wash Temperature

    Most dedicated synthetic base layer washes and general detergents will work perfectly well on a low temperature setting such as 30ºC. Even if the care label states a higher wash temperature tolerance, it is not a requirement to get synthetic base layers clean these days.

    Some people advocate washing synthetic base layers by hand in cold water, but this is time consuming and unnecessary for most garments. If in doubt, check the neck label.

    Drying

    Line Drying Base Layers Is Recommended

    The beauty of synthetic base layers is that they absorb very little moisture. If the wash has been put on a spin cycle then the base layers are going to dry very quickly on the clothesline in decent weather. If you need to hang the washing up inside the house, then please avoid hanging the base layers directly on radiators. Use a collapsible clothes horse to hang your base layers on and position near to the radiator. In our house we do this but place the horse near to our wood burner without any problems.

    Using a tumble dryer to dry synthetic base layers is best avoided as they can be unpredictable and  untrustworthy. Most base layers that shrink in tumble dryers are not down to the heat, but the length of time they are left in the dryer. If you do need a base layer quickly out of the wash, then set the tumble dryer to the coolest setting, remove any collected lint from the collection screen, and keep an eye on it. It is better to underestimate the time and keep on adding small increments after checking the dryness. Shrinking your synthetic base layers in a tumble dryer is not reversible.

    Ironing

    Again, ironing synthetic base layers is best avoided. It is very easy to use the wrong temperature setting when ironing a pile of clothes, and an iron on a high setting will glaze some synthetic fabrics and will melt others. If you hang them up tidily for drying and then fold them neatly when dry then creases will be avoided. In any case, who is going to see your base layers when you are outside anyway.

    Word Of Warning

    If you do wash and launder your synthetic base layers incorrectly and not according to the instructions, and something does happen to them such as a shrinkage or a deformity, the manufacturers will know it is your fault. Fabrics are so stable these days and manufactured in such high quantities that one bad item out of a batch of thousands is going to stick out like a sore thumb. The best tactic is to stick your hands up and admit you made a mistake, and if the manufacturer is half decent, they may give you discount off a new set or exchange the base layer in exchange for some PR material.

  7. Top 10 Christmas Gift Ideas For A Walker

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    Walkers Top 10 Kit

    If you are struggling to come up with ideas for the walker in your family then we have picked our top ten products that will keep them happy when outside in all weathers.

    1.Base Layers
    Sub Zero Base Layer Thermal Underwear Range For Walkers

    A cold walker is a miserable walker. Treat them to some  good quality base layers this Christmas and watch them transform from a prickly plodder to a happy hiker.

     

     

     

     

    2. Bottle Flask

    Klean Kanteen Stainless Steel Insulated Bottle Flask For Walkers

     

     

    If you are rather partial to a brew when walking and do not want to carry a stove, then taking an insulated vacuum flask with the tea or coffee already made is a great way of grabbing a quick cuppa when outdoors. Thermos flasks come in all shape and sizes these days, from wide mouth lunch jugs to robust stainless steel bottle flasks.

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Waterpoof Hat

    Waterproof Hats For Walkers

     

    Keeping your head dry in wet weather can be achieved either by pulling up your waterproof jacket hood or by wearing a waterproof hat. The advantages of using a waterproof hat rather than a hood is that they are more insulating, give you a better field of vision, and can be stored easily in a pocket or backpack.

     

     

     

     

    4. First Aid Kit

    First Aid Kits For Walkers

     

    Everybody has an accident at some point when walking, whether that be from stumbling on uneven ground, cutting a  finger on map edges, or  wearing poorly fitted walking boots that lead to blisters. If left untreated for any length of time, these wounds may hinder your progress or become infected. The solution is to carry a first aid kit in your backpack or pocket, allowing you to treat any minor injuries sustained by yourself or your walking group.

     

     

     

    5. Survival Bag

    Survival Bags And Blankets For Walkers

     

     

    Like all good boy scouts you should be prepared when stepping out in to the great outdoors. Lightweight and compact, these survival bags and blankets are manufactured form space age materials to keep you warm and dry until help arrives. They can also double up as a large visual aid should you get lost when walking.

     

     

     

     

     

    6. Insulated Down Jacket

    Insulated Down Jackets For Walkers

     

     

    The ultimate in walking comfort, insulated down jackets are like wearing a duvet on the hills. Being lightweight and compact, they can easily fit in to odd spaces in a backpack, and just need a good shake before being worn to activate the down insulation.

     

     

     

     

    7. Outdoor Compasses

    Brunton Outdoor Compasses For Walkers

     

     

    If the walker in your family is always getting lost then invest in a field compass to keep them on the straight and narrow. These compact lightweight navigational devices easily fit in to your jacket or trouser pocket, and come in a variety of styles with different features.

     

     

     

     

    8. Solid Fuel Camping Stoves

    Ghillie Kettle Solid Fuel Camping Stoves For Walkers

     

     

     

    Not the smallest of stoves we must confess but they eliminate the need for fuel to be carried. When you want a brew, just forage around for twigs, fir cones and leaves, and these Ghille Kettles will light with ease and boil water in a matter of minutes. Pan sets can be suspended above the top exhaust, allowing for a meal to be cooked at the same time. Manufactured in the UK from lightweight anodised aluminium, these solid fuel camping stoves are a very useful gadget for the survival enthusiast and minimalist walker.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    9. Walking Socks

    Technical socks for walkers

     

    Blisters and sores on walkers feet usually occur due to poor quality socks and bad fitting boots. Wearing a constructed walking socks will help to manage moisture, cushion your heel and sole, and help to prevent internal slipping and rubbing.

     

     

     

     

     

    10. Waterproof Gloves
    Waterproof Gloves For Walkers

     

    Wet hands quickly start to feel cold in the cooler months. Being able to keep them dry and also functional means that good fitting waterproof gloves are required.

     

     

     

     

  8. Find the perfect Christmas gift for explorers at Sub Zero Store

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    tent_trees

    With Christmas less than 50 days away, Sub Zero Store have put together our top Christmas gift ideas for the 12 days of Christmas!

    Sub Zero’s fantastic range of thermal clothing means that outdoor enthusiasts will keep warm in any weather. Cycling, hiking, camping, whatever the pursuit, wherever in the world, Sub Zero’s adventure accessories are the perfect Christmas gift for explorers of all ages. And with free delivery when you spend £75, you don’t have to brave the elements yourself!

    Be inspired by our Christmas gift ideas below, or take a look at our website for stocking fillers and much more!

    Christmas gift for winter sports

    1. Factor 1 Plus Thermal Underwear Base Layer

    Warm base layers to wear under your clothes for maximum comfort during outdoor adventures!

    2. Factor 2 Mid Layer Thermal Underwear

    Warm mid layers to wear either over a base layer on a really cold day, or on their own on warmer days.

    3. Polar Thermal Fleece Body Warmers

    With a lambswool lining these fantastic unisex gilets are perfect for winter walks

    Christmas gift kids winter clothing4. Factor 3 Thermal Fleece Heavyweight Beanie Hat

    This fleece beanie hat offers unbeatable protection in extremely cold temperatures.

    5. Extremities Waterproof Sticky Power Liner Lightweight Thermal Gloves

    These waterproof gloves are perfect for snowy adventures such as skiing and snowboarding.

    6. Extremities Sticky Thinny Children’s Thermal Glove

    Snug, lightweight but still warm, these children’s gloves, wear underneath
    base and mid layers Christmas giftwaterproof gloves for sledging, skiing…and building snowmen!

    7. Extremities Long Wool Mountain Thermal Socks

    The classic Christmas gift… a pair of socks! One of the best thermal
    socks on the market, these are guaranteed to keep feet warm on the slopes.

    8. Primus Stainless Steel Vacuum Insulated Thermal Commuter Mug 400ml

    Guaranteed to keep your drinks warm with no spills, even when turned upside down! Available in black, white or red and great for commuters on-the-go or people who work outdoors.

    Christmas gift for cyclists9. Lifeventure Ultra Lightweight Titanium Mug 450ml

    Made from high quality titanium alloy, this generously sized mug is an essential
    piece of kit for anybody who needs to keep weight and bulk to a minimum. Use
    as a cup or as a saucepan, this mug is great for camping or trekking.

    10. Lifeventure Ultra Lightweight Titanium Forkspoon

    This spoon and fork combination (affectionately known as a ‘spork’) is perfect for camping or backpacking when space is tight!

    11. Littlelife Toddler Dinosaur Daysack With Safety Rein

    Christmas giftLittle ones will love keeping their toys safe in these brilliant dino themed day sacks… and the added safety features will be a hit with parents too!

    12. Lifesystems Ultralight Intensity 220 LED Pocket Torch

    7 times brighter than a normal torch, the high power unbreakable CREE LED bulb and long-life lithium batteries, make this is the ultimate pocket torch. With an added SOS function, this gadget offers extra protection when on the hills
    at night or in low-light visibility.

    These are just a few of our Christmas gift ideas, take a look around subzerostore.co.uk for even more inspiration!

    Merry Christmas from Sub Zero Store!

  9. Base Layers and Mid Layers for All Weather Adventures

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    As hot days and light nights give way to autumn, the cooler temperatures offer perfect conditions for sports, challenges and outdoor adventures.

    This seasonal change needn’t put a stop to the things you love. Getting active in the autumn and winter is energising, inspiring and essential for a healthy mind and body.

    Base layers that warm you up while keeping you fresh are an essential part of your winter wardrobe. The right thermal clothing helps keep you active all year round. Combine thermal base layers with mid layers for total protection against the elements.

    Sub Zero Store offer high performance base layers suitable for the autumn and winter months, whether it’s the daily commute, weekend sports or family fun. Sub Zero base layers are also perfect for wearing underneath motorcycle clothing.

    Our wide range of thermal clothing and underwear for adults and children suits all activities and any budget.

    Base Layers for Kids

    Children's Base Layer

    Children’s Base Layer

     

    Kids’ thermal underwear comes in long or short sleeved tops with a soft fleece lining.

    The base layers have a soft cotton feel but all the benefits of a synthetic fabric, these garments offer comfortable flexibility for action packed adventures.

    From toddlers to teenagers, the weather won’t stop them having fun!

     

     

     

     

    Base Layers for Adults

    Adult Base Layer

    Factor 1 Adult Base Layer

    For active adults, Sub Zero recommend the Factor 1 base layer thermal and the Factor 1+ seamless thermal underwear range.

    Thermal long sleeved and short sleeved vests and leggings are 100% Polyamide, this soft fabric creates a warm, dry microclimate next to your skin, but at the same time removes perspiration.

    Our seamless option is knitted in a single body section for maximum comfort. With no seams to chafe they are the optimum base layer for active sports such as running, cycling, skiing and more.

    Starter Adult Base Layer

    Starter Adult Base Layer

     

     

     

    Sub Zero offer the Factor 1 Starter Base Thermal Underwear for more leisurely pursuits such as dog walking, gardening and every day activities.

    This base layer range offers excellent value for money and is great for those who are new to cold weather outdoor activities. Short sleeved and long sleeved vests and leggings have a soft, fleece inner face for extra warmth.

     

     

     

    Mid Layer Clothing

    Turtle Neck Mid Layer

    Turtle Neck Mid Layer

    For very cold temperatures you may need to combine base and mid layers. Layering clothes traps air against your skin for maximum comfort and prolonged warmth. A well-fitting combination will keep you warm and move with your body giving you complete flexibility for any activity in cold climates.

    Sub Zero’s extensive mid layer range of clothing includes long sleeved and short sleeved tops, leggings and an all in one.

     

    Finish your base layer combinations off with our stylish outer layer range, which includes fleeces, waterproof jackets, down jackets, hats, gloves and thermal socks and get ready for a truly memorable autumn!

     

  10. Enjoy Easter Safely In The Scottish Mountains

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    It will soon be Easter, but it’s still full-on winter in Scotland’s mountains. That’s the message from the Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS) and the British Mountaineering Council (BMC). The MCofS and BMC advise that climbers and hill walkers need to be realistic about the seriousness of the Scottish mountains at this popular time of year, and of the need to match knowledge and experience to mountaineering objectives.

     

    The Easter warning is being issued because:

    • Easter in Scotland is popular with groups travelling from further afield
    • Easter is quite early this year
    • The current winter conditions could continue through and beyond the Easter weekend.

     

    Sadly, this winter has seen a significant death toll on Scotland’s mountains, many of them related to avalanches. Avalanche awareness should be a key component of planning a trip to the mountains over the Easter holiday period. Anyone heading to the Scottish mountains at Easter is being encouraged to give serious consideration to the following ten-point checklist:

    1. Check the mountain weather and avalanche forecasts.
    2. Follow the MCofS on Twitter and Facebook, and check the “Something for the weekend” #sftwe safety tips on Fridays and Saturdays.  These messages warn of likely hazards over the coming weekend.
    3. Be realistic about your ability to interpret and act upon weather and avalanche forecasts.
    4. Be prepared to lower your expectations if weather, visibility and pace dictate.
    5. Allow for the remoteness of many Scottish mountains.
    6. Plan routes carefully and consider likely hazards like avalanche-prone slopes, river crossings and steep cliff faces.
    7. Read the Winter Safety pages on the MCofS website and watch the Ice Axe Self Arrest video on the MCofS YouTube channel.
    8. Day length increases at this time of year, but it is still easy to be caught out after dark.  Everyone in a group should carry a head torch and spare set of batteries or a spare head torch with new batteries.
    9. Be aware of everyone else in your group and don’t allow your group to get separated in poor visibility.
    10. Never be afraid to turn back. The most important objective of a day in the mountains is for there to be more days in the mountains in the future.

     

    MCofS President, Brian Linington, said, “There are always more visitors to Scottish mountains at Easter and Whitsun and we urge them to act upon this advice.  Many are keen to get to grips with the mountains, but the pattern when I was part of the Skye Mountain Rescue Team was for a high number of incidents at Easter.  This was due to a number of factors, including loose holds after winter ice had loosened everything up, together with very icy old snow patches in critical shaded spots.  Both factors caused fatalities in the Cuillin at Easter.”

    BMC Deputy CEO, Nick Colton, said, “The mountains of Scotland are glorious places to walk and climb.  Go prepared, plan and heed the advice that is available.  Remember conditions can change quickly and you may need to adjust those plans and expectations accordingly.  Enjoy the challenges and spectacular scenery that Scottish hills have to offer but, most importantly, get back down safely.”

    The BMC runs training events and publishes good practice information, to enable climbers, hill walkers and mountaineers to develop their skills.  Read the ‘Essential winter know-how’ at www.thebmc.co.uk/winter-climbing-and-walking-skills.

    We would remind climbers and walkers of the need to dress warmly, comfortably and flexibly to make the most of winter days out by building layers of clothing – baselayers, mid layers and outer layers.

     

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